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January 25-27

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June 11, 2018
Chef’s Choice

Haggis paratha

Justin Maule, Wild Fig

Recipe by Justin Maule, of Wild Fig Catering wildfigfood.com

Makes 4

Ingredients

200g Macsween haggis, cooked and forked through
75g spelt flour
125g plain flour
water
flaky sea salt
knob of butter

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1

In a bowl or stand mixer combine flours and a good pinch salt. Slowly start to mix, adding water until the dough begins to come together. Continue to knead dough till it becomes smooth, cover and rest for 10 mins

2

Divide haggis and dough into four equal amounts and shape into balls.

3

Flatten and roll out dough, taking care to roll thinner round the edges and keeping it raised in the middle. Place haggis ball on the raised middle of the dough and pull the edges over to cover. Make sure all haggis is enclosed, then gently flatten and begin to roll out.
Continue to roll, turning and dusting with flour if required until haggis stuffing has been evenly incorporated.

4

Heat a dry non-stick pan on the hob, when hot enough place paratha in pan to cook.Carefully turn over when first side is cooked and brush cooked side with a bit of butter. Flip again brushing the other side with butter.

5

Serve hot with some daal, chutney or dip of your choice, it’s also a great snack on its own.


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May 22, 2018
Chef’s Choice

Simple Spiced Lamb Flatbreads


In 2015 the Pollock family at Ardross Farm Shop made the decision to bring sheep back onto the farm to sell alongside its award winning produce from the local area including the Gartmorn Farm Poultry and Puddledub Pork. They introduced a breed of sheep called Easy-Care which fitted in with the farm and their farming philosophies perfectly.

These sheep lamb themselves outside leading to a more natural and less stressful lambing, and are also wool shedding which means no shearing, again reducing stress on animal and farmer. The sheep are outside all year round on a purely grass-fed diet, and Ardross Farm cuts silage to feed the sheep in the winter when grass is in short supply.

All these factors ensures that the lamb they end up with is a delicious eating experience, and chef Iain’s youngest son has declared his dad’s Simple spiced lamb flatbreads as his favourite tea. An accolade indeed.

Recipe from Ardross Farm Shop ardrossfarm.co.uk

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500g Ardross grass fed minced lamb

500ml Passata

1 tsp Cajun spice

1 tsp smoked paprika

2 cloves garlic, crushed

Salt and black pepper

To serve

Italian flatbreads

Fresh houmous

Fresh mint or basil


1

Brown the lamb mince in a pan then pour off any excess fat.

2

Add the garlic, cajun spice and smoked paprika to the pan and fry for a further minute.

3

Pour in the passata, lower the heat and simmer very gently for 10 mins, stirring frequently.

4

To serve, warm a flatbread for each person, spread with houmous and spoon on the mince. Sprinkle with torn mint or basil.

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April 18, 2018
Chef’s Choise

Curried Monkfish, zhug, carrot & lettuce

Jamie Scott, The Newport

Monkfish cheeks are one of the restaurant trades best kept secrets its rare to find them in a
fishmonger, however if you ask nicely and the right person they might be able to get them for you.
They are the perfect size for a portion for 2 per portion, deliciously meaty with very little sinew or fat
on them and are very cheap. This dish is a nice welcome to spring for us and this works as a delicious
build yourself salad.

Recipe by Jamie Scott, Patron Chef of The Newport thenewportrestaurant.co.uk

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Serves 4

Monkfish:
16 monkfish cheeks (sinew removed & cut in half if large)
200ml natural yoghurt
1 tsp madras curry powder
½ tsp fennel seeds
½ tsp cumin seeds
Zest of 1 lime

Zhug:
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp cumin seeds
½ black pepper
12 cardamom pods (seeds only)
8 garlic gloves
8 Thai green birds eye chillies
200g coriander
200g flat leaf parsley
400ml extra virgin olive oil

To serve:
2 carrots (peeled & grated on
100g thick Greek yoghurt
4 heads of baby gem lettuce (bad leaves discarded & nice ones picked down)
8-12 coriander sprigs
2 tsp toasted pistachios (lightly crushed)


1

Place a small pan on a medium heat, gently toast the spices and curry powder until you start to smell the oils. Add to the yoghurt and set aside. Using some bamboo skewers, skewer the monkfish cheeks 2-3 per skewer depending on size. Place the skewers onto a shallow baking tray and cover with yoghurt, leaver to marinade for 20-30 mins.

2

For the Zhug, in a blender add all the ingredients and 100ml of the oil, blend on a medium setting then gradually add the rest of the oil until a thick puree is formed. Remove from the blender and keep at room temperature.

3

Grate the carrot on the finest setting, place in a bowl and season with the lime zest, salt, pepper and 2 tbsp of olive oil.

4

Separate the gem lettuce leaves and keep in ice cold water to maintain their crispness.

5

To cook the monkfish, remove any excess yoghurt marinade and discard use a griddle pan and hearing until smoking. Brush the skewers with a small amount of oil then place then place on the griddle. Cook for 90 secs each side and then place on the bottom of the grill for 2 mins to finish off.

6

To serve, using 4 warm plates, place 2 of the skewers on each plate, a nice spoonful of the zhug and yoghurt. Crumble on some pistachios. Serve the lettuce and carrot on the side for everyone to build themselves.